Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Birth of a New Species

STR gave this just the right amount of explanation. Translation. They're still birds!

Wired magazine reports this story of a new finch species, loading the story with Darwinist enthusiasm.

Interesting. Neat. But they're still birds. No Darwinism here, folks! It's variation on a theme, and the theme hasn't changed, only offered a bit more variety.

HT: Stand to Reason Blog

4 comments:

ExPatMatt said...

"But they're still birds".

And you were expecting?.......

Whateverman said...

Look up the definition of the word species, and you'll find that this indeed is "Darwinism" in effect

James said...

Interesting. Neat. But they're still birds

Yes indeed, they are still Aves.

They're also still Coelurosaur's, who are still Theropods.

And that makes them still Dinosaurs, which are still Archosaurs.

They're also still Diapsid's, Amniotes and Terrestrial Vertebrates.

Which are all still Sarcopterygians and Gnathostomes, which are still Vertebrates.

Oddly enough, that makes them still Craniates, Chordates, Deuterostomes and members of the Bilateria group (aka. Triploblasts).

And, and I know you'll find this interesting given that you've expressed in interest in evolution, they're still animals too!

Oh, and finally, they're still eukaryotes, and are still a member of all life on earth.

I'll never understand why creationists insist on re-interpreting Genesis 1:21 to mean that evolution can't happen. All it says is that animals reproduce after their own kind. Well, all Eukaryotes produce Eukaryotes, all Dinosaurs produce Dinosaurs and all Aves produce Aves.

It is only because you draw an imaginary line between Dinosaurs and Finches that you insist that they're incompatible.

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To quote someone on another forum who successfully predicted this response two weeks ago:

"Durr - they're still birds, m'kay? If they'd really speciated, they'd be half bird, half jellyfish." - BaldySlaphead

Debunkey Monkey said...

Darn, I was hoping for a half-bird, half-jellyfish. I'd call it the jellybird. :/